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In "Gallows Lane," the Donegal summer dawns unusually hot, and Inspector Devlin returns to the borderlands separating the North and South of Ireland, waiting for a notorious ex-con, James Kerr, to return home on early release.

Kerr claims to have found God while in prison, but the superintendent of police wants him to stay on the other side of the border. When a young woman is found dead on a building site, Devlin is distracted from his assignment of keeping tabs on Kerr.

Inquiries into the murder soon point to a local bodybuilder and steroid addict. But days later, the born again ex-con Kerr is found nailed to a tree -- crucified. That's the set up in "Gallows Lane," by Brian McGilloway.

Increasingly torn between his young family and his job, Devlin is determined to apprehend those responsible for the murder before they strike again, even as the carnage begins to jeopardize those he care about most.

"Gallows Lane" is on the Reserve Shelf at Walla Walla Public Library.

Featured books will be available for the public today. They can also be placed on hold online at wallawallapubliclibrary,org or call the library for assistance at 527-4550. Other books include:

"The Bride Will Keep Her Name," by Jan Goldstein

Madison Mandelbaum is on top of the world. She's got a loving though totally neurotic family and two fabulous girlfriends, and best of all, she's head over heels in love with Colin Darcy -- an investigative reporter for NBC, a distant relation to the Queen and, most important, Mattie's fiance.

Be careful what you wish for, her mother is always fond of saying, but with Colin on her arm, Maddie is certain that everything will finally go right. With one week to go before the wedding, Maddie receives an anonymous e-mail that suggests that her fiance may not be the man she thinks he is. Is this someone's idea of a pre-wedding joke?

Yet as sinister phone calls, text messages and disturbing clues turn up, all linking Colin to the murder of a sexy call girl, Maddie realizes that she must get to the bottom of this. Fast.

As her search brings her ever closer to the knowledge she desperately seeks, Maddie finds her heart being tested in ways she's never dreamed of.

"The Secret Lives of Boys," by Malina Saval

Nerds, druggies, jocks. If television show and movies are to be believed, teenage boys in America all fall into one of these three categories. But is this really all there is? Or are boys far more complex than we give them credit for?

Rather than letting these stereotypes define American boys, journalist Malina Saval invites young men to explain how they define their lives. Crisscrossing the country, interviewing boys from different cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds, Saval introduces us to the next generation of male teens.

Highlighting the lives of 10 adolescents, Saval reveals what it's really like to be a young male today. Saval offers an uncensored look into boyhood as she reveals the confessions, sadness, optimism and seemingly boundless resilience of male adolescents today.

"Freedom In My Heart," edited by Cynthia Jacobs Carter

Unlike any other book on the market today, this richly illustrated companion volume uses the remarkable artifacts, images and documents of the United States National Slavery Museum to trace the entire history of slavery in North America, from the societies of ancient Africa to the repercussions still faced by Americans today -- and to celebrate the perseverance and ultimate triumph of a people.

"Freedom in My Heart" goes beyond the textbooks to call forth the unique voices, personal stories and cultural contributions of slaves and their descendants, demonstrating how enslaved African Americans remained free at heart to develop a vibrant culture in the face of unspeakable inhumanity.

Following a foreword by L. Douglas Wilder, the grandson of former slaves and the first African-American elected governor of a U.S. state, 10 compelling chapters offer the often unheard testimony of those who witnessed slavery and those whose ancestors endured it. Their voices blend with the contributions of such luminaries as South African leader Nelson Mandela, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, noted journalist Juan Williams, entertainers Bill Cosby and Ben Vereen and many more. This partnership with the National Slavery Museum grants exclusive access to never-before-seen images, personal letters and artifacts that shed new light on slavery and the activities surrounding it.

"The Law of Nines," by Terry Goodkind; "Every Man Dies Alone," by Hans Fallada.

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