Area runners participate in the Portland Marathon

Advertisement

Ranked as one of the top 10 local road-race events in the United States, and one of the top 40 races of all types and distances, the 2009 Portland Marathon on Oct. 4 had a number of racers from the Walla Walla Valley. Runner’s World called the Portland Marathon "the best people’s marathon in the West." For the past 10 years it has ranked the race as one of the top 10 or 15 marathons in the country.

Runner’s World also said, "perhaps more than any other running event in the country, this race keeps evolving, keeps getting better." Runner’s World gave the Portland Marathon "Race-of-the-Month" status and said the event is one of the "friendliest, best organized, most family-oriented races in the country."

"Marathon & Beyond gives us one of the highest point totals for excellence," organizers said. "We are also very proud of previous rankings by the Ultimate Guide to Marathons which has listed the Portland Marathon as ‘The best organized Marathon in North America.’ "

Since 1998, more than half the runner and walker finishers of the Portland Marathon have been female, according to its Web site. And in 2008, 58 percent of finishers were female.

The past two years, one-fourth of the participants have walked the route, a course that allows the run to stay open for eight hours.

Competitors started at 7 a.m. on Oct. 4 in 48-degree temperatures. In overcast conditions, 8,091 people completed the marathon.

Participant Gary Southern searched the Portland Marathon Web site (www.portlandmarathon.org/) for local participants. While he couldn’t find participants from Dayton, Wallula, Burbank or Touchet, he did find stats for the following folks from Walla Walla, Milton-Freewater, Waitsburg and Prescott:

Walla Walla: J.D. Jaspersen, net time 3:06:49, pace 7:08, division/place M 40-44/29, age 41, place 170; Ehren Wainwright, net time 3:28:26, pace 7:57, division/place M 25-29/137, age 26, place 630; Damien Sinnott, net time 3:29:21, pace 8:00, division/place M 35-39/133, age 38, place 667; Eric Hisaw, net time 3:33:28, pace 8:09, division/place M 35-39/147, age 37, place 765; Katie Rouse, net time 3:42:41, pace 8:30, division/place F 20-24/27, age -21, place 306; Michelle Carpenter, net time 3:58:30, pace 9:06, division/place F 35-39/138, age 37, place 655; Brent Dawson, net time 4:04:33, pace 9:20, division/place M 30-34/299, age 32, place 1,752; Gary Southern, net time 4:12:49, pace 9:39, division/place M 50-54/149, age 54, place 1,963; Sean Duffy, net time 4:13:55, pace 9:42, division/place M 45-49/244, age 49, place 1,995; Sunday Dawson, net time 4:55:09, pace 11:16, division/place F 35-39/385, age 35, place 2,082; Kyle Waetje, net time 4:55:09, pace 11:16, division/place F 30-34/392, age 30, place 2,083; Nikki Sharp, net time 4:56:45, pace 11:20, division/place F 25-29/471, age 29, place 2,133; Patricia Fackenthall, net time 5:54:23, pace 13:31, division/place F 65-69/10, age 66, place 3,051; John Fackenthall, net time 6:05:36, pace 13:57, division/place M 65-69/35, age 69, place 3,519; Alicia Garza, net time 6:08:48, pace 14:04, division/place F 30-34/597, age 30, place 3,204; Douglas Davis, net time 6:32:24, pace 14:58, division/place M 50-54/306, age 53, place 3,622; Malcolm Bohlman, net time 6:44:09, pace 15:25, division/place M 75-79/8, age 75, place 3,657; Rose Schwehr, net time 6:49:12, pace 15:37, division/place F 45-49/407, age 45, place 3,673; Sara Lorenz, net time 6:55:45, pace 15:52, division/place F 25-29/685, age 28, place 3,730; Jan Palumbo, net time 8:00:45, pace 18:21, division/place F 55-59/192, age 57, place 4,211;

Milton-Freewater: Harold Roemer, Milton-Freewater, net time 7:02:12, pace 16:07, division/place M 55-59/222, age 57, place 3,706.

Waitsburg: Maria Garcia, net time 4:30:32, pace 10:20, division/place F 45-49/123, age 45, place 1,461.

Prescott: Amy Hartford, net time 4:28:57, pace 10:16, division/place F 40-44/190, age 44, place 1,386.

The attitude of the 4,500 volunteers is that "All finishers are treated as winners."

Just six weeks before her 65th birthday and verging on retirement, Walla Wallan Jan Kennedy Foster published her first novel in September.

" ‘All Roads Lead Me Back to You’ revolves around the trials of a ranch in the hills east of Waitsburg," Jan said via e-mail.

"Desperate for help, the singlehand rancher, Alice Andison, hires an old-fashioned cowhand. The fact that the cowhand, Domingo Roque, is an illegal immigrant with a secret at the core of his life makes the situation problematical," she noted.

"The relationship of these two stubborn, capable people with identical skill-sets but radically different cultural assumptions, plays out against the daily struggle to keep the Standfast Ranch afloat."

Jan wrote under her maiden name, using Kennedy Foster as her nom de plume. A denizen of Walla Walla for 30 years, she said she’s "occupied a front-row seat at the Valley’s ongoing festival of agricultural and social evolution."

She said she’s "watched with admiration local growers’ bold and imaginative response to changing market and climate conditions." She’s also witnessed the melding of a substantial immigrant minority into Walla Walla’s cultural mix.

She feels that with both sustainable farming and the immigrant question in the news, "All Roads Lead Me Back to You" is likely to captivate a wide range of readers, especially in the West.

"I believe that this is one of the best books by a new Northwest author that I have read in years," wrote Thom Chambliss, executive director of Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association.

Jan was born in Detroit in 1944, raised in the Army. Her family lived in Germany, Virginia, California, Washington, D.C., Kansas, Alaska and Pennsylvania. She attended six elementary schools, three high schools, and two colleges,and earned a bachelor’s in 1966 from Grinnell College.

She wrote poetry and short stories, which were published in school literary magazines. They made her "mother proud but did not otherwise attract attention," she said.

The family traveled, from Iowa, where her two sons were born, to California, to Maryland, and finally to Southeastern Washington. She "rode a lot of borrowed horses and wrote in borrowed styles, having developed a transient’s habit of re-inventing herself in each new place," she said.

She discovered the unfamiliar, delightful sensation of finding roots in the Northwest. She gave up fiction and took such writing jobs as grants, financial-development boilerplates and newsletters. At 45, she discovered a vocation to teach.

She has taught English as a second language, basic writing and basic college skills at Walla Walla Community College since 1988.

About the writing of her first novel she says, "We went on sabbatical to Scotland, up in the north, Aberdeenshire.

"Six months in a bed-sit, freezing blast off the North Sea, dawn at nine, dark at three, no job, no acquaintance, and my life’s companion in the library from breakfast to teatime. So I had to write the book: no excuses.

"I felt like the dog in the Faulkner story who knew that if she wanted to keep on calling herself a hound, she would have to tackle the bear."

She and husband Edward, a scholar of medieval literature, live in Walla Walla, as she puts it, "with an indeterminate number of cats and not nearly enough horses."

"All Roads Lead Me Back to You" is from Pocket Books (Simon & Schuster), ISBN: 978-1439102046. It’s a rade paperback and sells for $15. See www.kennedyfoster.com for more details.

As former Walla Wallan Carol Moring Muzik puts it, she and husband Nick didn’t set out to raise an orphaned Canada goose.

But what else could they do when a day-old orphaned Canada gosling appeared on their doorstep?

That was the challenge faced by the couple, who live on Lake Coeur d’Alene.

They set about finding the gosling help or a home in the wild. When weeks turned into a month, they realized the goose they’d named Lucy had become a part of their family. They even taught her to fly, Carol said.

A 1971 Walla Walla High School alumna, she authored and beautifully illustrated a children’s non-fiction book, "Raising Lucy," which is based on the Muziks’ story of raising and successfully returning Lucy to the wild.

At first the Muziks tried every day to find wild geese or a rehabilitator to help them.

Stemming from the problems they had finding help, Carol is now committed to educating children and adults on when and how to help any wild animal, if this should ever happen to them.

A Whitworth graduate and former Sacred Heart Medical Center registered nurse, Carol documented her experiences through photography, video and through her original illustrations.

She is currently sharing Lucy’s story through her award-winning short film, a companion coloring book, and now the newly published children’s illustrated storybook.

Carol’s images depict real-life events in Lucy’s life with the family.

Carol speaks at schools and events and gives back to rescue and rehabilitation.

"Because we weren’t given advice or help when we needed it, Raising Lucy Studios gives to organizations that are trained to do just that. We did things wrong, but we did some things right and the fact that Lucy is still in the wild is a testament to that. But I now emphasize what an individual should do to help a truly orphaned animal."

"Raising Lucy — The True Story of Raising an Orphaned Wild Goose" hardcover book with full-color illustrations can be found or ordered through regional bookstores or online at www.RaisingLucy.com or through www.barnesandnoble.com. For more information, contact Carol at Raising Lucy Studios, P.O. Box 1695, Coeur d’Alene, ID, 83816, call 208-659-9172; e-mail lucygoose@raisinglucy.com; or online see Web site www.raisinglucy.com The book is $14.95.

What a kindness: from Nov. 2-7, the Walla Walla Public Library will accept Food for Fines.

Patrons can reduce their overdue fines by $1 for every can of food they bring into the Library, 238 E. Alder St. All food will be donated to Blue Mountain Action Council’s Food Bank.

The most useful items are canned soups, chili and stew; boxed meals; dry pasta; hot and cold cereal; rice; beans; macaroni & cheese; canned fruit or vegetables; and personal hygiene items such as toothpaste; shampoo and soap.

There appears to be a good supply already of peanut butter. Do not submit glass items, home-prepared or perishable items, however.

Librarian Beth Hudson said, "Don’t stay away because of fines — bring your canned food to the Library and pay down your fines."

The program is only for overdue fines and cannot be used for damaged or lost materials.

Call 524-4433 for more details.

The Walla Walla chapter of Job’s Daughters is holding its fall membership drive at 2 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Walla Walla Masonic Center, 607 E. Main St. Girls and their parents who are interested in finding out more about the international organization are encouraged to attend.

Those with questions or who want to sign up for the event should contact one of the group’s advisors, Kim Porter at 529-9597; or Nancy Walters at 386-8506.

The leadership organization is for girls between ages 10 and 20.

Through regular monthly meetings, the girls learn leadership and organizational skills by running their own meetings, working on committees, establishing fund raising projects and volunteering within the community.

Confidence is gained through public speaking and event planning. There is plenty of opportunity for fun through social events, including sleepovers, movie parties and game nights.

Those attending the Oct. 25 event will have the opportunity to carve pumpkins and participate in an old-fashioned cake walk. Parents will meet and be given more details on membership requirements.

Walla Walla Friends of Acoustic Music offer an ongoing activity for area enthusiasts to convene for a wonderful, friendly social time and opportunity to exercise to dance movement accompanied by a live band. The steps are even happily taught beforehand for the uninitiated.

The group recently relocated its functions to the Unity Church of Peace at 810 C St., near the Walla Walla Regional Airport. Once past the airport heading north, turn right onto Douglas Street and at the second intersection, turn left onto C Street. It’s the third building on the right.

The traditional old-time contra dances hold forth on on the third Saturday of the month at 7:30 p.m. Those with little or no experience can learn the basic steps with instruction at 7 p.m.

Callers Howard Ostby and Dan Clark will lead participants in contras, squares and other dances that include swing your partner and do-si-do. Experience and partners are not necessary.

Musicians with the Wednesday Night Band play jigs, reels and waltzes on a variety of acoustic instruments. Dancers are encouraged to wear soft-soled shoes to preserve the flooring, rather than lug boots or narrow-heeled shoes.

Participants are encouraged to bring finger foods and apple cider is provided. Admission is $5, or $3 for WWFAM members.

For more information, call Dan at 509-522-0399 or Howard at 541-938-7403. WWFAM’s Web site is at fam.bmi.net/ offers a current schedule, directions to functions and information on how to join the group.

Etcetera appears in daily and Sunday editions. Annie Charnley Eveland can be reached at annieeveland@wwub.com or afternoons at 526-8313.


Ranked as one of the top 10 local road-race events in the United States, and one of the top 40 races of all types and distances, the 2009 Portland Marathon on Oct. 4 had a number of racers from the Walla Walla Valley. Runner’s World called the Portland Marathon "the best people’s marathon in the West." For the past 10 years it has ranked the race as one of the top 10 or 15 marathons in the country.

Runner’s World also said, "perhaps more than any other running event in the country, this race keeps evolving, keeps getting better." Runner’s World gave the Portland Marathon "Race-of-the-Month" status and said the event is one of the "friendliest, best organized, most family-oriented races in the country."

"Marathon Beyond gives us one of the highest point totals for excellence," organizers said. "We are also very proud of previous rankings by the Ultimate Guide to Marathons which has listed the Portland Marathon as ‘The best organized Marathon in North America.’ "

Since 1998, more than half the runner and walker finishers of the Portland Marathon have been female, according to its Web site. And in 2008, 58 percent of finishers were female.

The past two years, one-fourth of the participants have walked the route, a course that allows the run to stay open for eight hours.

Competitors started at 7 a.m. on Oct. 4 in 48-degree temperatures. In overcast conditions, 8,091 people completed the marathon.

Participant Gary Southern searched the Portland Marathon Web site (www.portlandmarathon.org/) for local participants. While he couldn’t find participants from Dayton, Wallula, Burbank or Touchet, he did find stats for the following folks from Walla Walla, Milton-Freewater, Waitsburg and Prescott:

Walla Walla: J.D. Jaspersen, net time 3:06:49, pace 7:08, division/place M 40-44/29, age 41, place 170; Ehren Wainwright, net time 3:28:26, pace 7:57, division/place M 25-29/137, age 26, place 630; Damien Sinnott, net time 3:29:21, pace 8:00, division/place M 35-39/133, age 38, place 667; Eric Hisaw, net time 3:33:28, pace 8:09, division/place M 35-39/147, age 37, place 765; Katie Rouse, net time 3:42:41, pace 8:30, division/place F 20-24/27, age -21, place 306; Michelle Carpenter, net time 3:58:30, pace 9:06, division/place F 35-39/138, age 37, place 655; Brent Dawson, net time 4:04:33, pace 9:20, division/place M 30-34/299, age 32, place 1,752; Gary Southern, net time 4:12:49, pace 9:39, division/place M 50-54/149, age 54, place 1,963; Sean Duffy, net time 4:13:55, pace 9:42, division/place M 45-49/244, age 49, place 1,995; Sunday Dawson, net time 4:55:09, pace 11:16, division/place F 35-39/385, age 35, place 2,082; Kyle Waetje, net time 4:55:09, pace 11:16, division/place F 30-34/392, age 30, place 2,083; Nikki Sharp, net time 4:56:45, pace 11:20, division/place F 25-29/471, age 29, place 2,133; Patricia Fackenthall, net time 5:54:23, pace 13:31, division/place F 65-69/10, age 66, place 3,051; John Fackenthall, net time 6:05:36, pace 13:57, division/place M 65-69/35, age 69, place 3,519; Alicia Garza, net time 6:08:48, pace 14:04, division/place F 30-34/597, age 30, place 3,204; Douglas Davis, net time 6:32:24, pace 14:58, division/place M 50-54/306, age 53, place 3,622; Malcolm Bohlman, net time 6:44:09, pace 15:25, division/place M 75-79/8, age 75, place 3,657; Rose Schwehr, net time 6:49:12, pace 15:37, division/place F 45-49/407, age 45, place 3,673; Sara Lorenz, net time 6:55:45, pace 15:52, division/place F 25-29/685, age 28, place 3,730; Jan Palumbo, net time 8:00:45, pace 18:21, division/place F 55-59/192, age 57, place 4,211;

Milton-Freewater: Harold Roemer, Milton-Freewater, net time 7:02:12, pace 16:07, division/place M 55-59/222, age 57, place 3,706.

Waitsburg: Maria Garcia, net time 4:30:32, pace 10:20, division/place F 45-49/123, age 45, place 1,461.

Prescott: Amy Hartford, net time 4:28:57, pace 10:16, division/place F 40-44/190, age 44, place 1,386.

The attitude of the 4,500 volunteers is that "All finishers are treated as winners."

Just six weeks before her 65th birthday and verging on retirement, Walla Wallan Jan Kennedy Foster published her first novel in September.

" ‘All Roads Lead Me Back to You’ revolves around the trials of a ranch in the hills east of Waitsburg," Jan said via e-mail.

"Desperate for help, the singlehand rancher, Alice Andison, hires an old-fashioned cowhand. The fact that the cowhand, Domingo Roque, is an illegal immigrant with a secret at the core of his life makes the situation problematical," she noted.

"The relationship of these two stubborn, capable people with identical skill-sets but radically different cultural assumptions, plays out against the daily struggle to keep the Standfast Ranch afloat."

Jan wrote under her maiden name, using Kennedy Foster as her nom de plume. A denizen of Walla Walla for 30 years, she said she’s "occupied a front-row seat at the Valley’s ongoing festival of agricultural and social evolution."

She said she’s "watched with admiration local growers’ bold and imaginative response to changing market and climate conditions." She’s also witnessed the melding of a substantial immigrant minority into Walla Walla’s cultural mix.

She feels that with both sustainable farming and the immigrant question in the news, "All Roads Lead Me Back to You" is likely to captivate a wide range of readers, especially in the West.

"I believe that this is one of the best books by a new Northwest author that I have read in years," wrote Thom Chambliss, executive director of Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association.

Jan was born in Detroit in 1944, raised in the Army. Her family lived in Germany, Virginia, California, Washington, D.C., Kansas, Alaska and Pennsylvania. She attended six elementary schools, three high schools, and two colleges,and earned a bachelor’s in 1966 from Grinnell College.

She wrote poetry and short stories, which were published in school literary magazines. They made her "mother proud but did not otherwise attract attention," she said.

The family traveled, from Iowa, where her two sons were born, to California, to Maryland, and finally to Southeastern Washington. She "rode a lot of borrowed horses and wrote in borrowed styles, having developed a transient’s habit of re-inventing herself in each new place," she said.

She discovered the unfamiliar, delightful sensation of finding roots in the Northwest. She gave up fiction and took such writing jobs as grants, financial-development boilerplates and newsletters. At 45, she discovered a vocation to teach.

She has taught English as a second language, basic writing and basic college skills at Walla Walla Community College since 1988.

About the writing of her first novel she says, "We went on sabbatical to Scotland, up in the north, Aberdeenshire.

"Six months in a bed-sit, freezing blast off the North Sea, dawn at nine, dark at three, no job, no acquaintance, and my life’s companion in the library from breakfast to teatime. So I had to write the book: no excuses.

"I felt like the dog in the Faulkner story who knew that if she wanted to keep on calling herself a hound, she would have to tackle the bear."

She and husband Edward, a scholar of medieval literature, live in Walla Walla, as she puts it, "with an indeterminate number of cats and not nearly enough horses."

"All Roads Lead Me Back to You" is from Pocket Books (Simon Schuster), ISBN: 978-1439102046. It’s a rade paperback and sells for $15. See www.kennedyfoster.com for more details.

As former Walla Wallan Carol Moring Muzik puts it, she and husband Nick didn’t set out to raise an orphaned Canada goose.

But what else could they do when a day-old orphaned Canada gosling appeared on their doorstep?

That was the challenge faced by the couple, who live on Lake Coeur d’Alene.

They set about finding the gosling help or a home in the wild. When weeks turned into a month, they realized the goose they’d named Lucy had become a part of their family. They even taught her to fly, Carol said.

A 1971 Walla Walla High School alumna, she authored and beautifully illustrated a children’s non-fiction book, "Raising Lucy," which is based on the Muziks’ story of raising and successfully returning Lucy to the wild.

At first the Muziks tried every day to find wild geese or a rehabilitator to help them.

Stemming from the problems they had finding help, Carol is now committed to educating children and adults on when and how to help any wild animal, if this should ever happen to them.

A Whitworth graduate and former Sacred Heart Medical Center registered nurse, Carol documented her experiences through photography, video and through her original illustrations.

She is currently sharing Lucy’s story through her award-winning short film, a companion coloring book, and now the newly published children’s illustrated storybook.

Carol’s images depict real-life events in Lucy’s life with the family.

Carol speaks at schools and events and gives back to rescue and rehabilitation.

"Because we weren’t given advice or help when we needed it, Raising Lucy Studios gives to organizations that are trained to do just that. We did things wrong, but we did some things right and the fact that Lucy is still in the wild is a testament to that. But I now emphasize what an individual should do to help a truly orphaned animal."

"Raising Lucy — The True Story of Raising an Orphaned Wild Goose" hardcover book with full-color illustrations can be found or ordered through regional bookstores or online at www.RaisingLucy.com or through www.barnesandnoble.com. For more information, contact Carol at Raising Lucy Studios, P.O. Box 1695, Coeur d’Alene, ID, 83816, call 208-659-9172; e-mail lucygoose@raisinglucy.com; or online see Web site www.raisinglucy.com The book is $14.95.

What a kindness: from Nov. 2-7, the Walla Walla Public Library will accept Food for Fines.

Patrons can reduce their overdue fines by $1 for every can of food they bring into the Library, 238 E. Alder St. All food will be donated to Blue Mountain Action Council’s Food Bank.

The most useful items are canned soups, chili and stew; boxed meals; dry pasta; hot and cold cereal; rice; beans; macaroni cheese; canned fruit or vegetables; and personal hygiene items such as toothpaste; shampoo and soap.

There appears to be a good supply already of peanut butter. Do not submit glass items, home-prepared or perishable items, however.

Librarian Beth Hudson said, "Don’t stay away because of fines — bring your canned food to the Library and pay down your fines."

The program is only for overdue fines and cannot be used for damaged or lost materials.

Call 524-4433 for more details.

The Walla Walla chapter of Job’s Daughters is holding its fall membership drive at 2 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Walla Walla Masonic Center, 607 E. Main St. Girls and their parents who are interested in finding out more about the international organization are encouraged to attend.

Those with questions or who want to sign up for the event should contact one of the group’s advisors, Kim Porter at 529-9597; or Nancy Walters at 386-8506.

The leadership organization is for girls between ages 10 and 20.

Through regular monthly meetings, the girls learn leadership and organizational skills by running their own meetings, working on committees, establishing fund raising projects and volunteering within the community.

Confidence is gained through public speaking and event planning. There is plenty of opportunity for fun through social events, including sleepovers, movie parties and game nights.

Those attending the Oct. 25 event will have the opportunity to carve pumpkins and participate in an old-fashioned cake walk. Parents will meet and be given more details on membership requirements.

Walla Walla Friends of Acoustic Music offer an ongoing activity for area enthusiasts to convene for a wonderful, friendly social time and opportunity to exercise to dance movement accompanied by a live band. The steps are even happily taught beforehand for the uninitiated.

The group recently relocated its functions to the Unity Church of Peace at 810 C St., near the Walla Walla Regional Airport. Once past the airport heading north, turn right onto Douglas Street and at the second intersection, turn left onto C Street. It’s the third building on the right.

The traditional old-time contra dances hold forth on on the third Saturday of the month at 7:30 p.m. Those with little or no experience can learn the basic steps with instruction at 7 p.m.

Callers Howard Ostby and Dan Clark will lead participants in contras, squares and other dances that include swing your partner and do-si-do. Experience and partners are not necessary.

Musicians with the Wednesday Night Band play jigs, reels and waltzes on a variety of acoustic instruments. Dancers are encouraged to wear soft-soled shoes to preserve the flooring, rather than lug boots or narrow-heeled shoes.

Participants are encouraged to bring finger foods and apple cider is provided. Admission is $5, or $3 for WWFAM members.

For more information, call Dan at 509-522-0399 or Howard at 541-938-7403. WWFAM’s Web site is at fam.bmi.net/ offers a current schedule, directions to functions and information on how to join the group.

Etcetera appears in daily and Sunday editions. Annie Charnley Eveland can be reached at annieeveland@wwub.com or afternoons at 526-8313.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment

Click here to sign in