Bernice Lamberton

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September 29, 1918-April 3, 2010

Bernice Lamberton passed away in her sleep, early Saturday morning of April 3 atthe Walla Walla Odd Fellows Home. She was born Ilah Bernice Wall, on September 29,1918, near the prairie village of Macrorie, Saskatchewan. Her mother, Anna, was a skilled seamstress, and her father, Henry, was a musician and farmer. She was the fourth of six children. In the early 1930s, Bernice traveled to College Place, WA, to live with her Aunt and attend Walla Walla Valley Academy. She said the first time she ever saw more than one pair of automobile headlights at a timewas as she neared the U.S. border on her trip to begin school.

Bernice attended Walla Walla College for two years, and transferred tocomplete her R.N. degree at the Boulder Sanitarium in Colorado. She marriedmedical student Harold Lamberton in Redlands, CA in 1943. They were marriedfor 64 years until his death in 2008. Because Dr. Lamberton was in the ArmyMedical Corps, the family moved between bases and concluded their militarylife in Palmer, Alaska. They drove the Alcan Highway in December 1948, toBrewster, Washington where they would live until moving to Walla Walla in 1992.
Bernice gave birth to six children, and she also loved and cared for her threenephews whose parents and younger brother died in a private plane in 1957. Because of the extended and dedicated effort of the Civil Air Patrol to find her missing brother and family, Bernice's family asks that any memorial funds be sent to support that organization's volunteer work at www.civilairpatrolfoundation.com.

Bernice Lamberton was very close to her community, family, and children,and she exemplified a constant and trustworthy affection for the company of anyone who drove down the long driveway to the family's Sunny L Ranch. Many children and families lived in the Lamberton home - at one time Bernicehad nine teenaged boys in her house and kitchen. Under a poster called "TheWomen's West," she sat at the end of her kitchen table and listened to anyone. She regarded everyone as equal. She sought out people in need - itinerate laborers, hitchhikers, visiting physicians, and children.

She was proud of her children, and, although she constantly wished for moretime and organization, she kept meticulous letters, clippings, and photographs ofher family. In her style, she climbed Mt. Rainier without conditioning. She wasthe Washington State representative to the White House Conference on Children
during the Nixon Administration. She taught courses on natural childbirth,worked at times with her husband in the medical practice, and applied hernursing skills to the many injuries that occurred on the farm. She was especiallyinterested in psychiatric medicine, which she applied with a gift for listening.
She had a subtle sense of humor, which persisted through her entire life,and she could harmonize perfectly to hymns and obscure songs. She was a persistent advocate for peace. She believed in resilience and insisted thateveryone could reconcile.

She is survived by her children: Lynda Osborne, Daniel Lamberton, and Bernice "Bunny" Baker of Walla Walla; Ron Lamberton of Crawfordsville, North Carolina, Henry Lamberton of Loma Linda, California; and Katie Crane of Republic, Washington; Lloyd Wall of Kennewick, WA; Reg and Roy Wall of Port Alberni, British Columbia; brother Clifford Wall of Pine Grove, California; and nineteen beloved grandchildren. There will be a memorial service for Bernice Lamberton on Friday, April 9, at the Mountain View-Colonial DeWitt, 1551 Dalles Military Rd, Walla Walla at 7 pm, and a graveside service in Brewster, Washington this summer.

Friends may write memories and sign the online guestbook at mountainview-colonialdewitt.com.

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