Ghosts of the Civil War at Fort Walla Walla Museum

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With a bubble gum bubble from the soldier in the center bursting the illusion of the past, reenactors of the Confederacy's 7th Tennessee Infantry form a line to engage Union troops during a mock Civil War battle at Fort Walla Walla Days. The Civil War's 150th Anniversary was celebrated by Fort Walla Walla Museum in two events last month.

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Civil War Boot Camp participant Peter Vrieling charges Union troops during a mock battle at Fort Walla Walla.

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A wounded Union soldier rests his saber on his shoulder as he moves through the thick smoke of musket and cannon fire during a Civil War re-enactment at last month's Fort Walla Walla Days.

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Working together before the mock war, Union and Confederate re-enactors run through cannon-firing procedure prior to a battle.

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Replica artifacts were on hand for kids to see at the Civil War Boot Camp.

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A line of Confederate soldiers dissolves into musket fire from a Civil War battle re-enactment as Fort Walla Walla Days brings the past to life.

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A modern-day digital camera renders 'dead” Union re-enactors and a lone, surviving Confederate soldier in black and white, scattered on the battlefield in much the same way as photography in its infant days recorded the horror of our nation's Civil War.

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Re-enactor Michael Luther of the Confederate's 7th Tennessee Infantry plugs both ears just prior to the thunderous explosion of Civil War cannon fire at Fort Walla Walla Days.

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Union cannon fire, above, erupts on Confederate forces during a Civil War battle re-enactment at this year's Fort Walla Walla Days.

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Cap gun muskets wait in the shade while Civil War Boot Camp re-enactors explain fighting techniques used in the war to camp participants last month..

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A lady watches Union Troops from the background at this year's Civil War anniversary celebration at Fort Walla Walla Days.

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Weapons are discussed when Union and Confederate renactment forces appeared at this year's Civil War anniversary celebration at Fort Walla Walla Days.

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A re-enactment by Union and Confederate forces was part of this year's Civil War anniversary celebration at Fort Walla Walla Days.

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A Union soldier is shown during a re-enactment by Union and Confederate forces for the Civil War anniversary at Fort Walla Walla Days.

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A chaplain is shown, one of the Union troops participating in this year's Civil War anniversary celebration at Fort Walla Walla Days.

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A re-enactment by Union and Confederate forces was part of this year's Civil War anniversary celebration at Fort Walla Walla Days.

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A re-enactment by Union and Confederate forces was part of this year's Civil War anniversary celebration at Fort Walla Walla Days.

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The Union's 3rd Michigan Infantry's Kristen Hair bugles in the start of a new old day at Fort Walla Walla Days Saturday morning. Old mixed with the new as guests witnessed re-enactors dressed in period clothing from the Civil War period through World War I and were treated to a Civil War battle re-enactment complete with musket and carbine fire along with canon shots.

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Civil War re-enactor David Hair is with the Union's 3rd Michigan Infantry and one of the troops who helped with the re-enactment by Union and Confederate forces during the Civil War anniversary celebration at Fort Walla Walla Days.

This weekend, Walla Wallans are preparing to celebrate the Fourth of July, gathering with family and friends to commemorate the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776.

But the United States hasn't always been as compatible as the name implies.

The secession of 11 Southern states, which established the Confederacy, led to the deadliest conflicts in the nation's history.

The Civil War began 150 years ago and last month, Fort Walla Walla Museum held events marking the anniversary.

During Fort Walla Walla Days on June 11 and 12, three skirmishes between Union and Confederate soldiers were re-enacted.

Then June 21, a Civil War "Boot Camp" was held for kids ages 9-11.

Those attending learned about the life of a Union soldier by participating in a scavenger hunt/obstacle course, canteen decoration, flag-making and other hands-on activities.

Forty-four children attended the camp, according to the museum's communications manager, Paul Franzmann.

"The kids had a great time," he said.

Civil War facts

Hostilities began April 12, 1861, when Confederate forces attacked a U.S. military installation at Fort Sumter in South Carolina.

Confederate resistance ended after Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House in Virginia on April 9, 1865.

The warfare, mostly within the Southern states, resulted in the deaths of 620,000 soldiers and an undetermined number of civilian casualties.

Victory for the North meant the end of the Confederacy and of slavery in the United States, and strengthened the role of the federal government.

Source: Wikipedia

Fort Walla Walla Museum will be holding a second day camp this summer.

Pioneer Kids Camp, scheduled for July 19, will give children ages 9-11 a hands-on opportunity to learn about blacksmithing chores, gold panning, old-time musical instruments and to participate in other activities.

A fee of $30 per child will be assessed, with a discount to museum members and some financial aid available. Each participant will receive official camp gear, craft items they make and a pizza lunch.

The museum's day camp director is Marcie Anderson.

Registration forms are available at the museum store on Myra Road in Fort Walla Walla Park or online at www.fortwallawallamuseum.org/kids_camp.htm.

More information also is available by calling (509) 525-7703.

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