First lady doesn't 'trip' over girls' TV viewing

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First lady doesn’t ‘trip’ over girls’ TV viewing

WASHINGTON — Michelle Obama says she doesn’t “trip” about her daughters watching “Keeping Up with The Kardashians.”

The first lady said in an interview with iVillage that the girls “need to explore all of it: the great and the not so great” and “learn lessons from everything.”

Mrs. Obama said she wants to raise her girls with “the tools to make judgments” and she hopes she’s a good enough role model for them.

She called her daughters, 11-year-old Sasha and 14-year-old Malia, “pretty level-headed kids who can interpret stuff.”

As for dating, she said “we’re not in that territory yet,” but she vows not to embarrass them by talking publicly about their social life.

She is serving as a guest editor this week for the women’s website.

R&B singer Usher wins primary custody of sons

ATLANTA — Grammy-winning R&B singer Usher on Friday was awarded primary physical custody of his two sons, ending a long legal fight with his ex-wife.

Fulton County Superior Court Judge Bensonetta Tipton Lane ruled that the singer, 33, will have primary custody of 4-year-old Usher Raymond V and 3-year-old Naviyd Ely Raymond, according to Cherrise Boone, spokeswoman for the court clerk’s office. His custody will start Sept. 1.

Boone said Usher and his ex-wife Tameka Foster Raymond will have joint legal custody. The type of visitation hasn’t been determined yet for Tameka Raymond.

Usher’s lawyer, Ivory Brown, did not immediately return a call on Friday. Lisa West, a lawyer for Tameka Raymond, did not immediately return an email seeking comment.

Usher, whose real name is Usher Raymond IV, married Tameka Raymond in 2007. They divorced two years later. He said the couple had been separated since July 2008 and claimed there was “no reasonable hope of reconciliation” and the marriage was “irretrievably broken.”

In May, Usher testified that Tameka Raymond spit at and tried to fight with his girlfriend during one visit and that his ex-wife hit him during the dispute. He said he didn’t press charges because: “I didn’t want the boys to know that their father put their mother in jail,” he said.

Tameka Raymond’s attorney claimed that Usher provoked her client and that his account is exaggerated.

‘Drugstore cowboy’ author dies in Wash. Prison

SEATTLE — James Fogle, who wrote “Drugstore Cowboy,” an autobiographical crime novel that led to an acclaimed 1989 film starring Matt Dillon, has died. He was 75.

Fogle died Thursday at a prison in Monroe, Wash., about 30 miles from Seattle, said Selena Davis, a state corrections spokeswoman. A judge had sentenced him to almost 16 years in prison for holding up a pharmacy in a Seattle suburb in 2010, the last in a string of crimes that put him behind bars for most of his adult life.

Fogle died of probable malignant mesothelioma (meh-soh-thee-lee-OH’-muh), the Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s office said Friday.

He was terminally ill and barely able to breathe, but his sharp wit and creative drive were ever-present as he pushed Yost, one of his final visitors, to get another of his novels, the autobiographical “Doing It All,” onto the big screen, the Times reported.

“It’s amazing he was still writing,” Yost , who met Fogle while working as a journalist in Portland in the 1970s, told the Times. “He said he never killed anybody, and I don’t think he really hurt anybody. He was a person with a huge heart.”

Fogle had already spent much of his life in prison when he wrote “Drugstore Cowboy,” based on his experiences in a band of addicts who roamed the Pacific Northwest robbing pharmacies to feed their addictions. Filmmaker Gus Van Sant turned the novel into the acclaimed 1989 film.

Fogle only had a sixth-grade education but started writing his stories more than 40 years ago, the Times reported. Yost said Fogle occupied his time during lengthy prison lockups by writing unpublished novels and screenplays.

He wrote his only published novel, “Drugstore Cowboy,” in six weeks while serving a 20-year prison term for a pharmacy robbery in southwest Washington. Van Sant and Yost wrote the screenplay.

PR consultant: More Harry material may emerge

LONDON — Brace yourself, Harry.

A prominent British public relations guru said Friday he’d been approached by two women who claimed to have more material on Prince Harry, raising the possibility that the world may soon be seeing more compromising images of the British royal.

Earlier this week, celebrity gossip website TMZ published photos of Harry romping in the nude during a party at his Las Vegas hotel suite.

Many Britons have laughed off the 27-year-old prince’s hijinks, but questions have been raised about his publicly-funded security detail.

In a telephone interview, publicist Max Clifford said he had been called by two American women who claim they were in the prince’s hotel room in the U.S. last week. Clifford, a savvy operator famous for negotiating kiss-and-tell interviews, said the women “said they had lots of interesting things: pictures, video, that kind of thing.”

He said he turned them down.

“I couldn’t justify this,” he said. “It’s an infringement of his privacy. That’s why I said no.”

On Thursday, TMZ claimed that “several girls” had taken pictures at the party using their cellphones as the party got started and that “more photos were taken” after the clothes came off. Neither TMZ nor Clifford has made clear whether they believe the unreleased photographs show the prince in the nude.

British publications have largely steered clear of the photographs, with the prominent exception of Rupert Murdoch’s The Sun tabloid, which became the first paper to splash the pictures across its front page on Friday with the words: “HEIR IT IS!” and marketing the grainy photograph as a “souvenir printed edition.”

Britain’s Press Complaints Commission said it has received more than 850 complaints about the naked pictures in the tabloid, mostly from members of the public. Nearly all of the complaints are about invasion of privacy and will be investigated, the commission added.

The paper said it had defied the wishes of the royal family because there was a public interest in knowing what the prince, who represented the queen at the 2012 Olympic Games and is heavily involved in charity work, got up to while abroad.

Privacy lawyer Chris Hutchings, a partner at Hamlins LLP, said the paper’s public interest argument could have traction.

“The public interest argument is on the basis that Prince Harry represents this country around the world and the photos bring into question his suitability to act as a British ambassador,” Hutchings said, although he added: “The Sun have taken a calculated risk in publishing the photos given their inherently private nature.”

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