'Homeland' and 'Modern Family' win big at Emmys

Don Mischer, executive producer of the 64th Primetime Emmy Awards, left, host Jimmy Kimmel, center, and Television Academy chairman and chief executive Bruce Rosenblum attend the Emmy Awards Red Carpet Rollout at the Nokia Theatre on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012, in Los Angeles. The Emmy Awards will be held Sunday, Sept 23.

Don Mischer, executive producer of the 64th Primetime Emmy Awards, left, host Jimmy Kimmel, center, and Television Academy chairman and chief executive Bruce Rosenblum attend the Emmy Awards Red Carpet Rollout at the Nokia Theatre on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012, in Los Angeles. The Emmy Awards will be held Sunday, Sept 23. Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP

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The post-Emmy champagne surely tasted sweet for the people at “Modern Family” and “Homeland.”

“Modern Family” continued its run as television’s most honored comedy at Sunday’s Emmys, winning the best comedy award for the third year in a row, a directing honor for co-creator Steve Levitan and acting trophies for Julie Bowen and Eric Stonestreet.

The terrorism thriller “Homeland” won critical plaudits and the best drama Emmy, as well as top acting awards for Claire Danes and Damian Lewis. The writing for “Homeland” was also recognized. Showtime’s first-ever best drama honoree prevented “Mad Men” from winning its fifth straight best drama Emmy.

Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show” is one of the Emmy Awards’ sure things. It won the award for best variety show for the 10th straight year. CBS’ “The Amazing Race” won its ninth award for best reality show in 10 years.

Probably the least-predicted winner was Jon Cryer of CBS’ “Two and a Half Men” as best comic actor. He’s won the best supporting actor award in the past as second banana to Charlie Sheen. But with Ashton Kutcher replacing Sheen in the cast last season, Cryer moved up in class.

HBO’s freshman comedy “Veep” received mixed reviews, but Emmy voters loved veteran actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who won the best comedy actress award for her turn as a caustic U.S. vice president.

Julianne Moore’s uncanny take on Gov. Sarah Palin in the TV movie “Game Change,” about the 2008 presidential campaign, earned her best actress honors. The political film from HBO was also honored in the best miniseries-movie category.

Kevin Costner was named best actor for History’s wildly popular miniseries “Hatfields & McCoys,” while Tom Berenger was named best supporting actor for the project and Jessica Lange won supporting actress honors for “American Horror Story.”

Standup comic Louis C.K. won the Emmy for best comedy writing for “Louie” and for the special “Louis C.K. Live at the Beacon Theatre.”

Stonestreet won his second supporting actor award in a comedy in three years for his portrayal of a gay stay-at-home dad. The category was a testament to the strength of “Modern Family” in the comedy world: he beat three other actors from the show in Ed O’Neill, Ty Burrell and Jesse Tyler Ferguson.

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