Discovery documentary revisits Watergate movie

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NEW YORK — When Robert Redford first called Bob Woodward to talk about a movie that eventually became “All the President’s Men,” the Washington Post reporter didn’t call back.

Redford’s call came early in Woodward and Carl Bernstein’s reporting on the coverup that later toppled President Richard Nixon. Redford, who portrayed Woodward in the movie, said the writer later told him he didn’t believe it was the actor on the phone and was worried about being set up.

“I don’t know if it was that,” Woodward told The Associated Press. “I think we were busy and wondering why he might be calling.”

They were certainly busy, and a Discovery network documentary, “All the President’s Men Revisited” which airs tonight at 5, shows why. Ultimately the focus is far more on the Watergate case than the film about it.

“I didn’t want to make it too much about the movie,” Redford said. “That would be self-serving. The intention was to look back at that time and stay in that time, leaving any comparison with where journalism was or Congress was in that day compared to today to the audience to decide or think about.”

Politically, the contrast to today’s hyper-partisanship was most obvious when a House committee voted on articles of impeachment. The documentary lingers on the solemn roll call, making the point that members of Nixon’s own party had limits to how much they could stomach.

Redford hopes the Discovery show will bring the story of Watergate alive to young people who know about it only from books.

Amanda Knox: ‘Paralyzed’ with anxiety sometimes

SEATTLE — Amanda Knox says in a new interview that she’s sometimes “paralyzed” with anxiety stemming from the death of her roommate in Italy and the legal proceedings that saw her convicted then acquitted in a case that made headlines across the globe.

Knox spoke to People magazine recently over several days at her in mother’s home in Seattle. The magazine made excerpts of the interview available to The Associated Press.

Last month, Italy’s highest criminal court overturned her acquittal in the 2007 slaying of British student Meredith Kercher and ordered a new trial. Italian law cannot compel the 25-year-old Knox to return for the trial, and family spokesman David Marriott has said it’s doubtful she will go to Italy.

“When Meredith was murdered and I was arrested, it was so shocking. It was paralyzing. Everything toppled,” said Knox, who returned home to Seattle in 2011 after four years in an Italian prison.

Since returning to the United States in 2011, Knox has largely avoided the public spotlight and is mostly left alone in her Pacific Northwest hometown. She tells People she is still dealing with difficult emotions. A new trial also has been ordered for Sollecito. An Ivorian man is serving a 16-year sentence for the slaying.

Knox has a memoir, “Waiting to Be Heard,” due out April 30.

In the memoir, she details how she eventually became suicidal and thought of swallowing shards of glass or suffocating herself with a garbage bag.

Knox’s full interview will be published in the People’s April 26 edition.

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