Tamástslikt to exhibit Warhol artworks

A couple views large-format prints by Andy Warhol on loan from the Rockwell Museum of Corning, N.Y. The works are from the Cowboys and Indians exhibit, including this iconic Northwest Coast mask, left, and a Plains Indian shield.  It is said to be the final series Warhol produced. He was an ardent collector of such Native American artifacts. Warhol died in 1987.

A couple views large-format prints by Andy Warhol on loan from the Rockwell Museum of Corning, N.Y. The works are from the Cowboys and Indians exhibit, including this iconic Northwest Coast mask, left, and a Plains Indian shield. It is said to be the final series Warhol produced. He was an ardent collector of such Native American artifacts. Warhol died in 1987. Courtesy photo

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PENDLETON — Cowboys and Indians, a suite of prints published in 1986 by artist Andy Warhol, will be on exhibit Aug. 23-Oct. 26 at Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, 47106 Wildhorse Blvd.

Warhol was an influential artist in the 20th century and the leading figure in the visual art movement known as Pop Art.

The exhibit is said to have been the last series produced before Warhol’s death in 1987.

The suite is comprised of 10 large-format silk-screen prints.

Warhol drew from familiar icons of popular western culture — Annie Oakley, John Wayne, General Custer, Teddy Roosevelt — and counterposed them with American Indian images and artifacts — Geronimo, Indian Head Nickel, Mother and Child, Northwest Coast Mask, Kachina Dolls and Plains Indian Shield.

The exhibit is on loan from the Rockwell Museum of Corning, N.Y.

Warhol preferred that his artwork bear an assembly line quality, as if machined, replete with accidents that might mar or enhance the product. He endeavored to remove any trace of the artist from the art.

Notable in Cowboys and Indians is that the more eclectic artifacts represent the American Indian than faces of personages. The exquisite native art pieces may communicate more about tribal aesthetic values than cowboy icons convey about Americana.

Warhol was an avid collector of the kinds of American Indian artifacts pictured in the exhibit.

He used color in alarming, seemingly random manipulation of images. Warhol was known for using candy-colored hues to create garish pop images. The familiarity of the image was altered beyond reality.

The opening of the Warhol exhibit coincides with Tamastslikt’s 15th anniversary and the birthday party planned for that day from 6-8 p.m. Entrance into the Warhol exhibit is free all day on Friday and there is no charge to attend the opening reception and birthday party starting at 6 p.m. Cake and punch will be served.

For more information, call 541-966-9748.

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