Ports talk remodel due to Panama Canal project

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NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — Residents of this city’s Ironbound neighborhood are familiar with big modes of transport. Jumbo jets fly so low while approaching Newark Airport that it seems one can hop onto a wing. Double-decker trains race through, ferrying passengers to New York City. Trucks rumble down narrow streets.

But some here and in neighborhoods near other East Coast ports are leery of the monster ships that will soon arrive because of a trade project thousands of miles away that they believe will harm their air quality, roadways and waterways.

“We can’t afford any additional environmental burdens,” said Joseph Della Fave, executive director of the Ironbound Community Corp.

East and Gulf coast ports are jockeying against one another, scrambling to accommodate so-called “post-Panamax” ships: massive vessels that can traverse an expanded Panama Canal. The $5.25 billion project is expected to be completed in 2015 and will nearly triple the size of ships that can travel the canal.

One of the most remarkable transformations is proposed not far from the Ironbound. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey wants to raise the Bayonne Bridge, a soaring steel arch span that connects Bayonne, N.J., with New York City’s Staten Island borough, by 64 feet. The $1 billion project would allow post-Panamax ships to reach Port Newark and the Elizabeth Port Authority Marine Terminals in New Jersey and Howland Hook in New York. It was fast-tracked by President Barack Obama last year and is expected to be completed in 2016. Channels will be deepened to 50 feet.

The Coast Guard issued a draft environmental assessment of the project last month and found it will have no significant environmental or health effects. The public has until March 5 to review the report and comment.

The Environmental Protection Agency rebuked the Coast Guard in written comments, saying it has “fundamental concerns” with the Coast Guard’s findings and thinks a more robust examination must be done.

“We believe that an appropriate analysis would likely reveal changes in the distribution pattern of cargo which could reasonably be expected to result in environmental impacts, particularly air quality impacts associated with increased Port activity and associated diesel truck traffic,” the EPA wrote in remarks submitted to the Coast Guard.

In a statement, the Port Authority said raising the roadway will “have tremendous economic and environmental benefits for communities throughout the Port District.” The agency said it is “committed to clean air strategies ... and we will continue to work with our neighbors in the port district to ensure that our ports are healthy and economically viable moving forward.”

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