Ex-IRS chief can't explain targeting

Advertisement

WASHINGTON (AP) — The man who led the Internal Revenue Service when it was giving extra scrutiny to tea party and other conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status told Congress today he knew little about what was happening while he was still commissioner.

Douglas Shulman, who vacated his position last November when his five-year term expired, told the Senate Finance Committee he didn’t learn all the facts until he read last week’s report by a Treasury inspector general confirming the strategy.

Shulman said: “I agree this is an issue that when someone spotted it, they should have brought it up the chain. And they didn’t. I don’t know why.”

Shulman testified at Congress’ second hearing since an IRS official acknowledged the targeting and apologized before a legal group on May 10. Shulman and the two officials who testified at today’s three-and-a-half hour session — the outgoing acting commissioner, Steven Miller, and J. Russell George, the Treasury Department inspector general who issued the report — were all sworn in as witnesses, an unusual step for the Finance panel.

Shulman said he first learned of the targeting and the inspector general’s investigation in the spring of 2012, during the presidential election. He said that in a meeting with Miller, he was told that IRS workers were using a list to decide which groups seeking tax-exempt status should get special attention, that the term “tea party” was on that list and the problem was being addressed. But he didn’t know what other words were on that list or the scope of the activity.

Pressed by committee Chairman Max Baucus, D-Mont., on how the improper screening system could have occurred, Shulman said, “Mr. Chairman, I can’t say. I can’t say that I know that answer.”

Shulman said he took what he thought were proper steps — making sure the inspector general was looking into it. He did not tell Treasury officials about the activity.

“I don’t recall talking to anyone about it,” Shulman told the committee. “This is not the kind of information” that, with an inspector general’s probe underway, “should leave the IRS.”

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment