Area schools lag in Washington State learning goals

Valley schools' assessment results.

Information from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Valley schools' assessment results. Information from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

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Results of Washington state’s yearly check on its goal of closing the proficiency gap among public school students by half for reading and mathematics shows there is work to do.

Tallied at the state level, only one student sub-group is meeting reading and math goals so far.

The statewide results show that Asian students are meeting the goals. No other group did.

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Valley schools' assessment results. Information from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The students tested in these results are in grades third through eighth and 10th grade. The test was taken in the spring.

Results for Walla Walla Valley schools were similar.

College Place School District was the only area district to meet its goal in reading, and no districts met their math goals.

Walla Walla School district followed state trends, as its Asian students were the only subgroup to meet both math and English goals.

As a district, 65.6 percent of students were proficient in reading compared to a goal of 68 percent, and just 53 percent were proficient in math compared to a goal of 58.1 percent.

The state has until 2017 to close the proficiency gaps among students of different races, ethnicities and income levels, as part of a wavier it got from the federal government.

It is Washington’s answer to the federal education law known as “No Child Left Behind.” Washington has been granted a waiver to take a different approach to identifying and helping failing schools.

“The 2017 targets are realistic expectations for schools and subgroups, but they aren’t the end goals,” said state School Superintendent Randy Dorn in a statement.

In reading and math, white students and students of two or more races came close to meeting the set goals, but fell short by a couple of points.

The results of the “Annual Measurable Objectives” released Thursday also allow school districts and parents to gauge progress.

Parents are able to compare their neighborhood school with the school down the road and decide if they want to try to move their child to a school that is doing a better job of helping kids like them.

This and other information about public schools is available at the Washington State Report Card website.

Information from the Associated Press was included in this report.

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