‘Apollo 13’ portrays dangers of space travel

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I think in the movie “Apollo 13” the astronauts and NASA took such dangerous risks to send people to the moon because at that time no one had been on the moon and for people to land on the moon would have been a big achievement for NASA and mankind. They would get more information about the moon and space, which is why it was such a big deal for the Apollo 13 mission. The astronauts were viewed as such national heroes because they made it safely up and back alive, especially since it’s scary and such a dangerous risk.

Now one of the biggest questions asked is, who were the heroes of “Apollo 13”? I think their names were Jim, Jack and Fred. Last of all, the meaning of a hero to me is someone you look up to with anything. Someone you can trust, who is like no one else in the world. They could have done something for you, like saving your life, or something very big. Or, they could have done something small and simple that is very special to you and only you, and that makes you feel protected inside. Finally, a hero is someone you choose, someone you trust and can feel in your heart without advice from other people. They can be anyone that you decide on at one point for simple reasons or really big reasons — and that is what I think a hero is.


Mirella Esparza is 10 years old and a fifth-grader at Edison Elementary School. She likes to write and draw in her spare time.

Each month at the YMCA’s Community Center for Youth, a historical film is shown, accompanied by an essay prompt underlining the major theme(s) of the film. Each film highlights significant turning points in history, giving group members a chance to broaden their understanding of the events or time period, and allowing them to express their feelings on the subject manner. The kids are given one month to write a short paper answering an essay question. The author of the top essay is given $60, followed by $40 for second place and $20 for third. For more information about YCCY, call 509-525-8863, visit wwccy.org or ubne.ws/1mhcDBL, or follow @WWCCY on Twitter.

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